BBC Breakfast Talk Up Windows 7 Dismiss Rivals

Update: Please see Reply from Rory, and his blog entry describing his experience with Ubuntu.

Rory Cellan-Jones discussed Microsoft Windows 7 with Sian Williams and Bill Turnbull, the presenters of BBC Breakfast this morning. Once again the BBC reporting of Microsoft products turns into a bit of an advert combined with a slap in the face at the end from Rory to those people working on Free Software. My comments at the bottom.

07:46

Sian Williams: “Thank you very much Carol. More on Windows in just a moment, we’re rebooting, it’s got a new operating system and Rory Cellan-Jones will be here to test it”

Bill Turnbull: “First though, Simon, and more on that postal strike”

Simon in the studio, is having microphone problems. After a few moments Sian suggests that Simon fix his mic. Discussion of what they’ll do in the mean time including paper review and going straight to Rory.

SW: “Because Rory is still trying to reboot the Windows sytem…”

07:51

SW: “We’re talking about Microsoft Windows. At midnight the latest version comes out. It’s called Windows 7, it’s faster says Microsoft, and it also lets you use a touch screen computer.”

BT: “Well the success of the PC operating system is hugely important for the future of Microsoft because its prior version – Vista – got dismal reviews.”

SW: “Our Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones is here and he’s had the system for a week, and we had a little panic, but it’s all back and working”

RCJ: “You were going to be looking at a blank screen because I’m a Technology Correspondent therefore I have a few issues with technology”

RCJ: “Here it is. This is the touch screen version of a new operating system. The big selling point is that it’s supposed to be simpler, quicker, not such a big chunky heavy thing as Windows Vista, which as you said was a bit of a disaster”

RCJ holds up a boxed copy of Windows Vista.

RCJ: “Lots of people installed this then found various things didn’t work, their printers stopped working and so on. What Microsoft say is that this time we’ve learned our lesson, we’ve spoken to people, we’ve worked out what they want, and what people want is for things to work.”

RCJ: “So this is the touch screen version as I said, you can move various windows around, you can go to the start button down there to start things. Usual range of programs, I’ve been playing with it for a week and it seems to does what it says on the tin, it seems to be pretty efficient. But I think if you’re a very loyal windows person you’ll want it, if you’re not, perhaps you won’t.”

BT: “It does all the sorts of things that you’ve been able to get on an iTouch or iPhone, the Mac machines for some time.”

RCJ: “Well what you can do on an iPhone yes, not what you can do… what I’ve got here by chance is a a Mac computer. They will say their system, this (pointing at the Sony computer running Windows 7) has learned a lot from that (pointing at a Macbook Air running OSX). It doesn’t yet have touch screen capabilities, an actual Mac computer. But there are lots of other operating systems out there, but the key fact is that Windows is used by about 90% of the worlds computer users so it’s very important to them. ”

SW: “In the end you want it to work, work quickly and for all the applications to work. The touch screen thing, how many people will be buying a Windows system wanting the touch screen.”

RCJ: “It’s a gimmick isn’t it. It’s quite a fun gimmick”

RCJ tries 3 times to move a Window using the touch interface, and fails

RCJ: “It’s a bit of a flavour of the future of computing. There’s a lot of research going on saying that these things the mouse has a limited shelf life, will be redundant. In a few years time we’ll be moving things around the computer by wiggling our ears a Microsoft engineer told me yesterday. There will be new ways of interacting with them and this is just a staging post, but in the mean time you’re absolutely right people want to be confident that everything they normally do will work with the new system.”

BT: “If you’ve got a computer though and it’s not touch screen do you need this? Will this new program work for you?”

RCJ: “Lets be clear it’s not really about touch screen, that’s an added bell and whistle. Yes, it will work, and the key thing for Microsoft whereas vista didn’t work on this whole new range of small computers people are using – netbooks – this is a slimmed down version designed to run on those little computers too.”

SL : “Where does Windows stand with Apple in terms of competition and how many they sell?”

RCJ: “Well, Apple has been growing fast, has growing it’s market share, but from a tiny tiny base. I think it was 3% a few years ago in the states at least it’s doubled to 6%, a bit less than that. Of course it’s right at the luxury end of the market, you’re going to pay a lot more for an Apple in general than for a computer running WIndows.”

RCJ: “But what it has done is kind of wound Microsofts pride. It’s not really seen as cool anymore by the majority of computer users.”

BT: “There are other operating systems you can get for nothing.”

RCJ: “Absolutely, I was just showing one off here. There’s something called ‘Ubuntu’ which is launched next week. It’s a whole sort of little community of enthusiasts building operating systems for absolutely nothing and trying to persuade us that we don’t need to be in with the big boys but actually most computer users frankly they don’t want to bother with that sort of stuff they want something that’s there…”

BT: “..that everyone else uses..”

RCJ: “Yes”

SW: “Vista came out three years ago and as you say it wasn’t very well received, and a lot of people went back to XP. Those people who are still on XP now, are they likely to go with the new version, should they go with the new version, does it offer much more?”

RCJ: “It does offer a lot more, but I think people will be cautious. What sensible people do is sit around a bit see what happens to other people, see how secure it is, and there will be updates, there are inevitably updates, very swiftly when you bring out a new system. You see the sort of hiccups you iron them out, and I think a lot of people will wait to see what happens.”

BT: “Can we touch it yet”

RCJ: “You can touch it, but you did break it”

A few points that came to mind:-

  • I don’t recall such a review of OSX Snow Leopard when it came out, BBC biased towards Microsoft?
  • Will there be a similar review of other OS releases this month/year such as Ubuntu and others?
  • Why focus so much on the touch elements if most computers don’t have a touch screen and it’s a ‘gimmick’. Perhaps it just makes good telly, even if it’s somewhat misguided
  • No mention of the pain users will have upgrading
  • No mention of the cost
  • No mention of the fact that OSX is cheaper, instead focussing on the cost of Apple hardware. Isn’t this an OS review, not a hardware review. I’d bet that Sony touch screen Rory used isn’t exactly cheap
  • ‘little community’ building Free Software you say Rory? Dismissive and unnecessarily Patronising
  • ‘don’t want to bother with that sort of stuff’. I find many users don’t want to ‘bother’ with viruses, malware and broken software, but they do, on Windows
  • Ubuntu isn’t ‘out next week’. The latest version is. Ubuntu has been around for 5 years (this week). What we’re doing is no different to Microsoft shipping a new release of Windows, and Apple shipping a new OSX. It just so happens ours is free

Rory, please feel free to come along to the Ubuntu Release Party next Thursday 29th in London, and you can meet some of the great people who help put Ubuntu together.

Update: Whoops, Sian Willams, not Sian Lloyd. Apologies Sian, thanks Dave. Gah, sorry Bill, got that wrong too..

24 Other Comments

56 thoughts on “BBC Breakfast Talk Up Windows 7 Dismiss Rivals”

  1. First off, I think Microsoft has actually done a pretty good job with Windows 7. I’m actually keen to buy it, depending on the cost, for at least one of my machines, and possibly more. I think it’s looking like a pretty solid upgrade, and a good chunk of engineering. I don’t think it behoves the open-source community to start bad mouthing it until it’s shown some faults, that’s the kind of behaviour one expects from – well, Microsoft.

    That said, I’m more than a little disappointed that the BBC is suggesting that Ubuntu is a hobby project of a few people that’s not out yet. Windows I’ll cheerfully use for games – my kids use it, too – and I have a Windows machine for development purposes, too.

    But the bulk of my work is all done on Ubuntu, and has been for a number of years. There’s lots of reasons for that – stability for a development platform is particularly important, standards-based architectures make open-standards development simpler, and so on. I’m sure I don’t need to list reasons here.

    There are some people saying that the rather dramatic improvement in Windows (alongside the frenetic activities leading up to, and hamstringing, Vista) is down to the abrupt change in direction forced on Microsoft by the rise in desktop Linux, particularly on netbooks, as well as the increasing visibility of the Macs – and I think they have a good point.

    So while Rory is reasonably correct to say that Windows 7 is in response to the increased market share of the Mac, I think he’s missing the point that this isn’t really about market share, it’s about visibility, and it’s far from being just Macs – witness the way Windows 7 hardware requirements have carefully dropped to cover the significant netbook market, which has little to do with Mac OS X, and everything to do with Linux.

    So in summary, it’s tempting to say that yes, Windows 7 is looking good. And it’s down to Linux.

    1. I don’t think there is any inherent pro-Windows bias at the Beeb.

      You just have to consider that 90% of computer users are using Windows. That makes the release of major new version “news”. Hence it will appear on BBC News.

      Similarly items about Google are far more common than those about other search engines. Why? Because most of us out here in the real world are using Google to search.

      Again, Ubuntu might be great. And I’m sure every other Linux Distro is. And probably OS2 as well. But the fact is that they just don’t have significant market share at present, so new releases of them doesn’t count as “news” in the same way that a new release of the software used by 90% of computer users is.

      In fact I’d ask more questions of the Beeb when the continually focus on things that very few people seem to be using, eg Second Life and more recently Twitter. Twitter really does seem to be something that a small number of people with too much time on their hands use to describe the boring minutiae of their lives – but the media attention it gets as a result is staggering. I don’t know anyone who has ever used it more than once.

  2. To suggest that there is parity between Apple and Microsoft operating systems is lunatic – having said that I hope we see you moaning about RCJ reporting at length about any Apple launch.

    Ubuntu has less users than OSX for goodness sake – and yet you want parity with that too. Don’t get me wrong there are some seriously good bits of free software out there (most of it head and shoulders better than the stuff that either Microsoft or any one else charges for), but for the run of the mill user (ie the sort of people that watch BBC Breakfast) they are often too tricky to master.

    Like it or loathe it Win 7 is the biggest thing in the computer market this week, a perfect excuse for minority interests to whine true, but really get over yourself.

    1. I care little for the reporting of Apple per-se, my main gripe is the dismissive tone taken against alternatives to Windows. It’s reporting like this that actually helps to perpetuate the myth that only Windows will do. Millions of people use OSX, and millions use Linux based operating systems. They’re not all wrong.

    2. Actually Ubuntu 9.04 is so easy to use that it only asks you three things when you install it, 1- what language do you wish to use, 2-what time zone are you in, 3- whats your name it does all this then you can go and make a coffee while it insalls, what is so hard about asking all the questions in one go ;-)

      Once you have set up your wifi connection (I have quite an obscure wifi card which used to be an issue but now installs perfectly and automatically in this versi0n)

      Then you just click add/remove programs and simply install any other programs that you need. For the benefit of Windows users add/remove programs in linux show you all the possible programs that you can automatically install from a Linux Repository, no just what is installed on your machine!

      The whole process can be done in less than 15 minutes, I even have it installed on a bootable USB stick, and you can boot to it on a cd to diagnose problems on your pc. I use the USB stick to trace problems at work but ask your IT manager before you go doing it!

  3. I’ve never really felt that the BBC is biased towards Microsoft, usually towards Apple. It seems like every time a new iPhone or iPhone app comes out there is some lazy journalist reporting on it, purely it seems to get the app paid for on their expenses.

    I think they did a good job actually mentioning Ubuntu, I think the BBC will probably be the only one reporting on Free alternatives to Win7. It is unfortunate that Rory is under-informed.

    Frankly, it’s breakfast news. It’s not about debate or any kind of complex rhetoric, it’s about simple reports showing things that are interesting and shiny, which Win7 falls in to quite easily.

    It’s unfortunate about Rory’s dismissive tone, but it simply shows that we still have some work to do. I hope in the interests of balanced reporting, Rory will turn up to see what Ubuntu is all about, rather than have 100 fanboys writing aggressive e-mails about his 5 minute segment.

    1. I agree that it’s great we’re “on telly”, but the negative tone is what kicks. I don’t think Rory is necessarily under informed, he had a short amount of time to talk about Windows 7, and even less time to mention the rivals. Fact is they were dismissed.

      Whether it’s a ‘serious’ programme such as Newsnight or Panorama (hah!) or something lighter such as BBC Breakfast or The One Show is irrelevant. It’s all about the eyeballs. People stick the telly on in the morning and have it on in the background. The stuff they go may well be tomorrows chip-wrapper, but many people do remember this stuff.

      1. Negative tone does not matter one bit.

        As long as people hear the name Ubuntu everything is great.
        A campaign manager for Clinton once said something like: “Message does not matter as long as you get people to know your name.”

        1. I think when he said that probably matters!

          In the early stages of a political contest, it’s a matter of putting yourself up there as a candidate. It doesn’t matter what people think of you, providing they categorise you as a presidential candidate. After that point when they decide look at the options, and the tennor of the debate shifts, then people will notice what you say.

          The problem is that product launches are not like presidential elections;
          as much as softwear guys might like them to be, people’s choices are not synchronised, so the different stages of public relations stuff must happen simultaneously.

          So the dissmissive innacurate publicity is ok but not great in the first stage, terrible in the latter stage.

  4. The simple fact is that this Windows release is big news. It’s getting great reviews.

    Bias toward Microsoft? Probably only due to the fact that Windows has such a huge market share and therefore is newsworthy to a larger audience.

    1. I agree. Windows 7 is indeed big news. From reviews I’ve seen it’s better than every previous release. Same could be said of the most recent version of Ubuntu, OSX, DOS, BSD, OS/2 and so on. It shouldn’t be surprising that the latest == greatest should it?

      What should also matter is competition. Windows isn’t the only kid on the block. Yeah, it’s the big kid with many of the toys and a lot of friends, but there are others, many others, and some of them are pretty damned good.

  5. BBC love MS, I’ve been yelling at the telly for the past week or so as they run another scare story and a new virus or the new “scareware” that has come out hoping to get your credit card details and drop a trojan or 2 onto your PC.

    What’s their advice? Well they trudge out a “technology” reported who duly advises that you should ensure your AV software and OS is patched and up to date with no mention of the alternative solutions such as using a secure OS!

    The only reason MS have a 90% share is that their operating system practically ships as standard on every single desktop PC that is sold worldwide, I’m certain that once we get to the day that Ubuntu or the next big thing in Linux is shipped installed by default in the same manner then it’s market share would rocket.

    Personally I’m quite happy using my OS built by a “little community of enthusiasts” and if they wanted a good comparision maybe someone should have loaded the same Sony POS overpriced desktop with Ubuntu, enabled Compiz and given them a proper demonstration of some eye candy ;-)

  6. And whilst we’re correcting names, it’s Bill Turnbull (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/breakfast/presenters/1809239.stm) not Turnball.

    On another note I think you’re pretty spot on with your assessment of this piece of “reporting”. The news is Windows 7, but there’s not reason, especially for a publicly funded organisation, to belittle the alternatives.

    Personally I grew up on Windows, moved to Linux about 8 years ago, and then moved to MacOS X 2 years ago. Ubuntu is doing a fantastic job, but the marriage between hardware and software of the Apple products is unrivalled. Windows Vista I tried for 1h and just couldn’t fuse with. I hope Windows 7 will be better, not for me, but so that I can stop hearing about the moaning about how a virus/trojan/etc/etc is bothering my fellow monkeys. I just don’t care about Windows anymore, that ship has sailed.

    1. I might be missing something, but even XP had a Tablet edition (which we use on a handful of Toshiba tablet laptops here where I work).

      Those particular laptops aren’t touchscreen as they have styluses, but that’s more of a physical property of that particular screen, I don’t see why with the correct hardware XP couldn’t also have touchscreen functionality.

  7. I contacted Rory Cellan-Jones over facebook and this is what he had to say about his ‘community of enthusiasts’ comment:

    “James,
    Live television is a tricky business and I probably phrased that badly in the heat of the moment.
    If I may defend myself, it was my decision to mention Ubuntu twice on Breakfast TV within an hour – probably the most high profile mention in front of a mass audience that it’s ever had.

    The second time around I was trying – rather clumsily I admit – to put it nto the context of the overall OS market. I still think it’s hard to make the case that installing Linux on a home computer is anything other than the preserve of hobbyists right now.

    But I did get emails and thanks for the mention from people connected with Ubuntu – and we plan to give next week’s launch some coverage on our site.

    Thanks for your comments – but can I stress again that we do our utmost to be fair.

    best wishes,

    Rory “

    1. That’s pretty cool. Thats some pretty cool detective work James.

      I was attempting to, but entirely failed to say in my earlier post that; considering he had a limited, and reduced, amount of time to talk, we were lucky to get a mention at all. Rory’s dismissive tone was perhaps emphasised by Turnbull’s under-informed view.

      I personally believe the BBC and Linux/Open Source are a match made in heaven. But it must be difficult to portray that to the viewers who may never have heard of it.

  8. Of all the major new organizations the BBC usually has the best coverage of Ubuntu and technology in general. Well on their websites at least.

    I guess it is hard to phrase stuff on tv and at least it got mentioned on TV… although negatively. Bad press is better than no press.

  9. I think, for some strange reason, you’ve mistaken BBC Breakfast for a news programme; it’s a gossip and catch-up service for “Strictly Come Dancing”.

    If only someone had told Rory about Samba. Ubuntu would have got loads more airtime…

  10. Hi,

    Thanks for transcribing my bumbling appearance on BBC Breakfast. A couple of points – as you can tell from the stream of agitated incoherence that you’ve transcribed, live television is a tricky business. 30 seconds before I went on air that PC had a blank screen – someone had switched the output to video in my absence – so I was even more inarticulate than usual. Never work with children, animals or technology.

    Secondly, I worked hard in both live broadcasts on Breakfast – and elsewhere on the BBC yesterday – to get in a mention of Linux systems. I bet that’s the first time Ubuntu has had two mentions on national TV in an hour. I know it’s not launching next week – just a new version. And yes that was a patronising line about small bands of enthusiasts – I should have phrased it better, and I’m hoping to write more about Ubuntu later.

    Oh – and is it really unfair to talk about the price of Apple hardware? The laptop I had with me was the Macbook Air, which is lovely but even more expensive than that Sony Vaio touchscreen we were using.

    Anyway – always glad to hear reactions. Can I stress that we do try to give a fair picture of technology developments,while believeing it’s important to try to reach a mass audience, most of whom will not be as knowledgeable as readers of this blog. It’s a difficult tightrope to walk and sometimes we fall off.
    best wishes,
    Rory Cellan-Jones

    1. Good answer Rory, and I did clock all your mentions of “free” alternatives on Radio 4 yesterday – clearly the news story was about the Windows release and I think you did a good job, particularly also when discussing (I’m paraphrasing based on memory) the desire to have the OS “be invisible / get out of the way” and the potential decreased relevance of a desktop OS in the first place on the PM piece yesterday evening. Nice to see you taking the time to respond around the web, too!

    2. Thanks for taking the time to reply, Rory!
      I had the fortune of seeing the short piece you did the hour before, which I thought what a more balanced discussion, and was elated that you took the time to mention Ubuntu at the end.
      Obviously you can’t make it exactly the same every time with the conditions of a live broadcast, but it’s admirable of you to take the time to clarify what your points in the face of a disgruntled community.

    3. So one of the most corporate and mass-market-aimed GNU-Linux distributions is still “preserve of hobbyists” to the BBC’s high profile techs? Big councils have gone for Linux, big insurers have gone for it… but maybe they all look like just hobby enthusiast groups when you work for a large broadcaster. :-/

      How about a bit of love for British-developed computing systems from the British Broadcasting Service? Leave Microsoft to Sky…

  11. I still don’t understand what the story is with Windows 7. Why is it a story worth dedicating time to? Nobody should give a damn about operating systems – these are not innovative pieces of technology! They don’t allow you to do any more – they are just new for the sake of being new, glossier for the sake of looking new, and with the slim possibility that work will be very slightly easier due to some new user interface innovation (and the possibility that something else will be much harder as the option you once new where to find has gone AWOL).

    I feel exactly the same way about Snow Leopard or Karmic – except that Karmic comes with the packaging of new versions of hundreds of applications that do affect how I work.

    In all of this coverage of Windows 7 I’ve not seen a single USP. I know what Windows 7 is now. But why Windows 7? WHY?

  12. This has “Paid for by Marketing Firm X on behalf of Microsoft” written all over it. It’s full of Microsoft talking points.

  13. Your choice of OS and the cult of worship around it doesn’t really matter that much to the larger whole of humanity. It bothers you, and that’s the sad part. Grow up and unplug. There is a whole world out there. I hope you find it someday.

  14. Hi, I sent in a bit of a whinge to Radio 4s Feedback on the very same issue (it’s up on my blog if you’re interested). I noticed what I perceived to be a similar bias in a radio news bullitin, where the only free OS mentioned was Google’s OS which hasn’t even got a release date yet!

    Thanks for writing the reply Rory, but I still can’t escape the feeling that free and open source are being discriminated against.

  15. It looks like the BBC crumbled and capitulated rather than face a prolonged campaign of moaning about it, from Popey & Me :)

    We’d better go and say a rather embarrasing “Thankyou” to them for the rather superb coverage they’ve given the Karmic release this morning!

  16. Rory Cellan-Jones is officially a Technology Correspondent in BBC and was called the Internet Correspondent till around 2000. Currently a BBC Breakfast host, Rory Cellan-Jones had a hard time a week ago when he made some comments on Ubuntu on the show with Sian Williams and Bill Turnbull.

    Rory was having a talk with Bill Turnbull and Sian Williams on Windows 7. It all fired up when Bill Turnbull mentions the presence of other Operating systems which are available for free.
    Rory replies with,Absolutely, I was just showing one off here. There’s something called ‘Ubuntu’ which is launched next week. It’s a whole sort of little community of enthusiasts building operating systems for absolutely nothing and trying to persuade us that we don’t need to be in with the big boys but actually most computer users frankly they don’t want to bother with that sort of stuff they want something that’s there…Bill seconds him with a..that everyone else uses..Popey gets upset with all this and puts a transcript of the show on his blog.

    Next, Canonical approaches Rory with an offer to try out Ubuntu 9.10 and send him a Dell Inspiron Mini loaded with Karmic Koala. Rory likes the faster startup of the Ubuntu box he received. But that seems to be the only thing he liked. He did not quite enjoy the possibility of using Window softwares with WineI also gave up on attempting to use the music streaming service Spotify, after a warning that, as there was no Linux version, I would first need to get hold of something called Wine which allows you to run Windows apps. Too much bother…
    Navigating around an unfamiliar system was fine once I’d worked out that the Ubuntu logo in the top left hand corner of the screen took me home, and for all my simple computing needs – from word processing to e-mail to web browsing – I found Ubuntu pretty satisfactory.
    But, even after some help from a Canonical advisor who came and installed a few add-ons such as Flash, I struggled to work out how I would organise photos, music and video with this system.
    So would I actively seek to install Ubuntu or any other Linux variant on a machine I already owned?
    To be frank, no, because it would not make my computing life any simpler and more pleasurable than it is now.Now, having said all that, he receives 300+ comments, each averaging to around 150 words.

    I am not saying whether it was right or wrong for him to say all that. But when you are addressing a whole bunch of people right in the morning, everything that you say stays in their heads and makes up the gossip for the day.

    All that happened might be covered by three kinds of people.

    First, those who are complete Linux noobs, they will only get more frightened to even think of running Ubuntu now, especially when that big “NO” comes from a BBC Technology Correspondent. They would never know anything out of Windows for the rest of their lives.

    Secondly, there is a certain bunch of people who are primarily Windows users and also enjoy using Linux. Windows is the most popular OS strictly because of its ease of use. Linux can be easily hacked and modified. The user’s choice of an OS depends completely on his needs but familiarity with one particular OS is no reason to stick to it. It is fun for them. This bunch includes me.

    Thirdly, there are Ubuntu enthusiasts who found this very intimidating, indeed it is for those who get involved in free and Open Source developments of this huge a scale and receive this kind of a feedback.Share: Comment on This | Tweet This | Share on Facebook | Save to Delicious |Stumble This | Digg This |Reddit This

    TAGS: bbc review of ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala, bbc talk on ubuntu 9.10, bbc ubuntu 9.10 verdict, rory cellan-jones, ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala
    BBC Breakfast Talk on Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala originally appeared on Techie Buzz written by Chinmoy Kanjilal on Sunday 1st November 2009 04:00:24 PM. Please read the Terms of Use for fair usage guidance.
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    This comment was originally posted on Techie Buzz, know your technology head on

  17. Rory Cellan-Jones is officially a Technology Correspondent in BBC and was called the Internet Correspondent till around 2000. Currently a BBC Breakfast host, Rory Cellan-Jones, had a hard time a week ago when he made some comments about Ubuntu on the show with Sian Williams and Bill Turnbull.

    Rory was having a talk with Bill Turnbull and Sian Williams on Windows 7. It all fired up when Bill Turnbull mentions the presence of other Operating systems which are available for free.
    Rory replies with,Absolutely, I was just showing one off here. There’s something called ‘Ubuntu’ which is launched next week. It’s a whole sort of little community of enthusiasts building operating systems for absolutely nothing and trying to persuade us that we don’t need to be in with the big boys but actually most computer users frankly they don’t want to bother with that sort of stuff they want something that’s there…Bill seconds him with a..that everyone else uses..Popey gets upset with all this and puts a transcript of the show on his blog.

    Next, Canonical approaches Rory with an offer to try out Ubuntu 9.10 and send him a Dell Inspiron Mini loaded with Karmic Koala. Rory likes the faster startup of the Ubuntu box he received. But that seems to be the only thing he liked. He did not quite enjoy the possibility of using Window softwares with WineI also gave up on attempting to use the music streaming service Spotify, after a warning that, as there was no Linux version, I would first need to get hold of something called Wine which allows you to run Windows apps. Too much bother…
    Navigating around an unfamiliar system was fine once I’d worked out that the Ubuntu logo in the top left hand corner of the screen took me home, and for all my simple computing needs – from word processing to e-mail to web browsing – I found Ubuntu pretty satisfactory.
    But, even after some help from a Canonical advisor who came and installed a few add-ons such as Flash, I struggled to work out how I would organise photos, music and video with this system.
    So would I actively seek to install Ubuntu or any other Linux variant on a machine I already owned?
    To be frank, no, because it would not make my computing life any simpler and more pleasurable than it is now.Now, having said all that, he receives 300+ comments, each averaging to around 150 words.

    I am not saying whether it was right or wrong for him to say all that. But when you are addressing a whole bunch of people right in the morning, everything that you say stays in their heads and makes up the gossip for the day.

    All that happened might be covered by three kinds of people.

    First, those who are complete Linux noobs, they will only get more frightened to even think of running Ubuntu now, especially when that big “NO” comes from a BBC Technology Correspondent. They would never know anything outside of Windows for the rest of their lives.

    Secondly, there is a certain bunch of people who are primarily Windows users and also enjoy using Linux. Windows is the most popular OS strictly because of its ease of use. Linux can be easily hacked and modified. The user’s choice of an OS depends completely on his needs but familiarity with one particular OS is no reason to stick to it. It is fun for them. This bunch includes me.

    Thirdly, there are Ubuntu enthusiasts who found this very intimidating, indeed it is for those who get involved in free and Open Source developments of this huge a scale and receive this kind of a feedback.Share: Comment on This | Tweet This | Share on Facebook | Save to Delicious |Stumble This | Digg This |Reddit This

    TAGS: bbc review of ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala, bbc talk on ubuntu 9.10, bbc ubuntu 9.10 verdict, rory cellan-jones, ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala
    BBC Breakfast Talk on Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala originally appeared on Techie Buzz written by Chinmoy Kanjilal on Sunday 1st November 2009 04:00:24 PM. Please read the Terms of Use for fair usage guidance.
    You might also like:Tweak Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic KoalaUpgrade to Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala from Ubuntu 9.04Download Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala DVDDownload Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Netbook Remix

    This comment was originally posted on Techie Buzz, know your technology head on

  18. Rory Cellan-Jones is officially a Technology Correspondent in BBC and was called the Internet Correspondent till around 2000. Currently a BBC Breakfast host, Rory Cellan-Jones, had a hard time a week ago when he made some comments about Ubuntu on the show with Sian Williams and Bill Turnbull.

    Rory was having a talk with Bill Turnbull and Sian Williams on Windows 7. It all fired up when Bill Turnbull mentions the presence of other Operating systems which are available for free.
    Rory replies with,Absolutely, I was just showing one off here. There’s something called ‘Ubuntu’ which is launched next week. It’s a whole sort of little community of enthusiasts building operating systems for absolutely nothing and trying to persuade us that we don’t need to be in with the big boys but actually most computer users frankly they don’t want to bother with that sort of stuff they want something that’s there…Bill seconds him with a..that everyone else uses..Popey gets upset with all this and puts a transcript of the show on his blog.

    Next, Canonical approaches Rory with an offer to try out Ubuntu 9.10 and send him a Dell Inspiron Mini loaded with Karmic Koala. Rory likes the faster startup of the Ubuntu box he received. But that seems to be the only thing he liked. He did not quite enjoy the possibility of using Window softwares with WineI also gave up on attempting to use the music streaming service Spotify, after a warning that, as there was no Linux version, I would first need to get hold of something called Wine which allows you to run Windows apps. Too much bother…
    Navigating around an unfamiliar system was fine once I’d worked out that the Ubuntu logo in the top left hand corner of the screen took me home, and for all my simple computing needs – from word processing to e-mail to web browsing – I found Ubuntu pretty satisfactory.
    But, even after some help from a Canonical advisor who came and installed a few add-ons such as Flash, I struggled to work out how I would organise photos, music and video with this system.
    So would I actively seek to install Ubuntu or any other Linux variant on a machine I already owned?
    To be frank, no, because it would not make my computing life any simpler and more pleasurable than it is now.Now, having said all that, he receives 300+ comments, each averaging to around 150 words.

    I am not saying whether it was right or wrong for him to say all that. But when you are addressing a whole bunch of people right in the morning, everything that you say stays in their heads and makes up the gossip for the day.

    All that happened might be covered by three kinds of people.

    First, those who are complete Linux noobs, they will only get more frightened to even think of running Ubuntu now, especially when that big “NO” comes from a BBC Technology Correspondent. They would never know anything outside of Windows for the rest of their lives.

    Secondly, there is a certain bunch of people who are primarily Windows users and also enjoy using Linux. Windows is the most popular OS strictly because of its ease of use. Linux can be easily hacked and modified. The user’s choice of an OS depends completely on his needs but familiarity with one particular OS is no reason to stick to it. It is fun for them. This bunch includes me.

    Thirdly, there are Ubuntu enthusiasts who found this very intimidating, indeed it is for those who get involved in free and Open Source developments of this huge a scale and receive this kind of a feedback.Share: Comment on This | Tweet This | Share on Facebook | Save to Delicious |Stumble This | Digg This |Reddit This

    TAGS: bbc review of ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala, bbc talk on ubuntu 9.10, bbc ubuntu 9.10 verdict, rory cellan-jones, ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala
    BBC Breakfast Talk on Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala originally appeared on Techie Buzz written by Chinmoy Kanjilal on Sunday 1st November 2009 04:00:24 PM. Please read the Terms of Use for fair usage guidance.
    You might also like:Tweak Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic KoalaUpgrade to Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala from Ubuntu 9.04Download Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala DVDFive years of Ubuntu: Warty Warthog to Karmic Koala

    This comment was originally posted on Techie Buzz, know your technology head on

  19. Rory Cellan-Jones is officially a Technology Correspondent in BBC and was called the Internet Correspondent till around 2000. Currently a BBC Breakfast host, Rory Cellan-Jones, had a hard time a week ago when he made some comments about Ubuntu on the show with Sian Williams and Bill Turnbull.

    Rory was having a talk with Bill Turnbull and Sian Williams on Windows 7. It all fired up when Bill Turnbull mentions the presence of other Operating systems which are available for free.
    Rory replies with,Absolutely, I was just showing one off here. There’s something called ‘Ubuntu’ which is launched next week. It’s a whole sort of little community of enthusiasts building operating systems for absolutely nothing and trying to persuade us that we don’t need to be in with the big boys but actually most computer users frankly they don’t want to bother with that sort of stuff they want something that’s there…Bill seconds him with a..that everyone else uses..Popey gets upset with all this and puts a transcript of the show on his blog.

    Next, Canonical approaches Rory with an offer to try out Ubuntu 9.10 and send him a Dell Inspiron Mini loaded with Karmic Koala. Rory likes the faster startup of the Ubuntu box he received. But that seems to be the only thing he liked. He did not quite enjoy the possibility of using Window softwares with WineI also gave up on attempting to use the music streaming service Spotify, after a warning that, as there was no Linux version, I would first need to get hold of something called Wine which allows you to run Windows apps. Too much bother…
    Navigating around an unfamiliar system was fine once I’d worked out that the Ubuntu logo in the top left hand corner of the screen took me home, and for all my simple computing needs – from word processing to e-mail to web browsing – I found Ubuntu pretty satisfactory.
    But, even after some help from a Canonical advisor who came and installed a few add-ons such as Flash, I struggled to work out how I would organise photos, music and video with this system.
    So would I actively seek to install Ubuntu or any other Linux variant on a machine I already owned?
    To be frank, no, because it would not make my computing life any simpler and more pleasurable than it is now.Now, having said all that, he receives 300+ comments, each averaging to around 150 words.

    I am not saying whether it was right or wrong for him to say all that. But when you are addressing a whole bunch of people right in the morning, everything that you say stays in their heads and makes up the gossip for the day.

    All that happened might be covered by three kinds of people.

    First, those who are complete Linux noobs, they will only get more frightened to even think of running Ubuntu now, especially when that big “NO” comes from a BBC Technology Correspondent. They would never know anything outside of Windows for the rest of their lives.

    Secondly, there is a certain bunch of people who are primarily Windows users and also enjoy using Linux. Windows is the most popular OS strictly because of its ease of use. Linux can be easily hacked and modified. The user’s choice of an OS depends completely on his needs but familiarity with one particular OS is no reason to stick to it. It is fun for them. This bunch includes me.

    Thirdly, there are Ubuntu enthusiasts who found this very intimidating, indeed it is for those who get involved in free and Open Source developments of this huge a scale and receive this kind of a feedback.Share: Comment on This | Tweet This | Share on Facebook | Save to Delicious |Stumble This | Digg This |Reddit This

    TAGS: bbc review of ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala, bbc talk on ubuntu 9.10, bbc ubuntu 9.10 verdict, rory cellan-jones, ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala
    BBC Breakfast Talk on Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala originally appeared on Techie Buzz written by Chinmoy Kanjilal on Sunday 1st November 2009 04:00:24 PM. Please read the Terms of Use for fair usage guidance.
    You might also like:Download Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala DVDTweak Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic KoalaUpgrade to Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala from Ubuntu 9.04Download Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Netbook Remix

    This comment was originally posted on Techie Buzz, know your technology head on

  20. Rory Cellan-Jones is officially a Technology Correspondent in BBC and was called the Internet Correspondent till around 2000. Currently a BBC Breakfast host, Rory Cellan-Jones, had a hard time a week ago when he made some comments about Ubuntu on the show with Sian Williams and Bill Turnbull.

    Rory was having a talk with Bill Turnbull and Sian Williams on Windows 7. It all fired up when Bill Turnbull mentions the presence of other Operating systems which are available for free.
    Rory replies with,Absolutely, I was just showing one off here. There’s something called ‘Ubuntu’ which is launched next week. It’s a whole sort of little community of enthusiasts building operating systems for absolutely nothing and trying to persuade us that we don’t need to be in with the big boys but actually most computer users frankly they don’t want to bother with that sort of stuff they want something that’s there…Bill seconds him with a..that everyone else uses..Popey gets upset with all this and puts a transcript of the show on his blog.

    Next, Canonical approaches Rory with an offer to try out Ubuntu 9.10 and send him a Dell Inspiron Mini loaded with Karmic Koala. Rory likes the faster startup of the Ubuntu box he received. But that seems to be the only thing he liked. He did not quite enjoy the possibility of using Window softwares with WineI also gave up on attempting to use the music streaming service Spotify, after a warning that, as there was no Linux version, I would first need to get hold of something called Wine which allows you to run Windows apps. Too much bother…
    Navigating around an unfamiliar system was fine once I’d worked out that the Ubuntu logo in the top left hand corner of the screen took me home, and for all my simple computing needs – from word processing to e-mail to web browsing – I found Ubuntu pretty satisfactory.
    But, even after some help from a Canonical advisor who came and installed a few add-ons such as Flash, I struggled to work out how I would organise photos, music and video with this system.
    So would I actively seek to install Ubuntu or any other Linux variant on a machine I already owned?
    To be frank, no, because it would not make my computing life any simpler and more pleasurable than it is now.Now, having said all that, he receives 300+ comments, each averaging to around 150 words.

    I am not saying whether it was right or wrong for him to say all that. But when you are addressing a whole bunch of people right in the morning, everything that you say stays in their heads and makes up the gossip for the day.

    All that happened might be covered by three kinds of people.

    First, those who are complete Linux noobs, they will only get more frightened to even think of running Ubuntu now, especially when that big “NO” comes from a BBC Technology Correspondent. They would never know anything outside of Windows for the rest of their lives.

    Secondly, there is a certain bunch of people who are primarily Windows users and also enjoy using Linux. Windows is the most popular OS strictly because of its ease of use. Linux can be easily hacked and modified. The user’s choice of an OS depends completely on his needs but familiarity with one particular OS is no reason to stick to it. It is fun for them. This bunch includes me.

    Thirdly, there are Ubuntu enthusiasts who found this very intimidating, indeed it is for those who get involved in free and Open Source developments of this huge a scale and receive this kind of a feedback.Share: Comment on This | Tweet This | Share on Facebook | Save to Delicious |Stumble This | Digg This |Reddit This

    TAGS: bbc review of ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala, bbc talk on ubuntu 9.10, bbc ubuntu 9.10 verdict, rory cellan-jones, ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala
    BBC Breakfast Talk on Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala originally appeared on Techie Buzz written by Chinmoy Kanjilal on Sunday 1st November 2009 04:00:24 PM. Please read the Terms of Use for fair usage guidance.
    You might also like:Upgrade to Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala from Ubuntu 9.04Tweak Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic KoalaUbuntu 9.10: Karmic Koala Frequently Asked Questions [FAQ]Download Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala DVD

    This comment was originally posted on Techie Buzz, know your technology head on

  21. Rory Cellan-Jones is officially a Technology Correspondent in BBC and was called the Internet Correspondent till around 2000. Currently a BBC Breakfast host, Rory Cellan-Jones, had a hard time a week ago when he made some comments about Ubuntu on the show with Sian Williams and Bill Turnbull.

    Rory was having a talk with Bill Turnbull and Sian Williams on Windows 7. It all fired up when Bill Turnbull mentions the presence of other Operating systems which are available for free.
    Rory replies with,Absolutely, I was just showing one off here. There’s something called ‘Ubuntu’ which is launched next week. It’s a whole sort of little community of enthusiasts building operating systems for absolutely nothing and trying to persuade us that we don’t need to be in with the big boys but actually most computer users frankly they don’t want to bother with that sort of stuff they want something that’s there…Bill seconds him with a..that everyone else uses..Popey gets upset with all this and puts a transcript of the show on his blog.

    Next, Canonical approaches Rory with an offer to try out Ubuntu 9.10 and send him a Dell Inspiron Mini loaded with Karmic Koala. Rory likes the faster startup of the Ubuntu box he received. But that seems to be the only thing he liked. He did not quite enjoy the possibility of using Window softwares with WineI also gave up on attempting to use the music streaming service Spotify, after a warning that, as there was no Linux version, I would first need to get hold of something called Wine which allows you to run Windows apps. Too much bother…
    Navigating around an unfamiliar system was fine once I’d worked out that the Ubuntu logo in the top left hand corner of the screen took me home, and for all my simple computing needs – from word processing to e-mail to web browsing – I found Ubuntu pretty satisfactory.
    But, even after some help from a Canonical advisor who came and installed a few add-ons such as Flash, I struggled to work out how I would organise photos, music and video with this system.
    So would I actively seek to install Ubuntu or any other Linux variant on a machine I already owned?
    To be frank, no, because it would not make my computing life any simpler and more pleasurable than it is now.Now, having said all that, he receives 300+ comments, each averaging to around 150 words.

    I am not saying whether it was right or wrong for him to say all that. But when you are addressing a whole bunch of people right in the morning, everything that you say stays in their heads and makes up the gossip for the day.

    All that happened might be covered by three kinds of people.

    First, those who are complete Linux noobs, they will only get more frightened to even think of running Ubuntu now, especially when that big “NO” comes from a BBC Technology Correspondent. They would never know anything outside of Windows for the rest of their lives.

    Secondly, there is a certain bunch of people who are primarily Windows users and also enjoy using Linux. Windows is the most popular OS strictly because of its ease of use. Linux can be easily hacked and modified. The user’s choice of an OS depends completely on his needs but familiarity with one particular OS is no reason to stick to it. It is fun for them. This bunch includes me.

    Thirdly, there are Ubuntu enthusiasts who found this very intimidating, indeed it is for those who get involved in free and Open Source developments of this huge a scale and receive this kind of a feedback.Share: Comment on This | Tip Techmeme | Tweet This | Share on Facebook | Save to Delicious |Stumble This | Digg This |Reddit This

    TAGS: bbc review of ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala, bbc talk on ubuntu 9.10, bbc ubuntu 9.10 verdict, rory cellan-jones, ubuntu 9.10 karmic koala
    BBC Breakfast Talk on Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala originally appeared on Techie Buzz written by Chinmoy Kanjilal on Sunday 1st November 2009 04:00:24 PM. Please read the Terms of Use for fair usage guidance.
    Comment and Get Backlinks!! We have enabled CommentLuv on the site and also have follow links for top commentators from the home page and site-wide links from rest of the site. Learn more about new commenting poilices @ Techie Buzz

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    You might also like:Five years of Ubuntu: Warty Warthog to Karmic KoalaUbuntu 9.10: Karmic Koala Frequently Asked Questions [FAQ]Download Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Netbook RemixTweak Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala

    This comment was originally posted on Techie Buzz, know your technology head on

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