FOSDEM 2015 Field Report

A little late, but here’s my report from attending FOSDEM 2015 back at the start of February.

I’ve been to FOSDEM a few times in the past, but not for the last few years. It happened to co-incide with other events, or other family things took priority and then got out of the habit, so I’d not ended up going for 6 years or so!

This year at the last minute I applied for some funds to go, was accepted and made the most of it. I’ve listed below all the talks & sessions I went to, with some brain dump notes I took about some of them. At the bottom I listed some sessions which I didn’t enjoy or get a lot out of, but are listed for completion. I’ve also linked directly to the videos of the talks if they’re available at the time of writing. If not I’ve linked to the directory they should appear in at some point in the future.

A GPS watch made of free software and hardware – Federico Vaga, Matthieu Cattin
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/main_track-hardware/gps_watch__CAM_ONLY.mp4

Recycle your Android devices for anything: run real Linux on them – David Greaves
Talk video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-embedded/sailfishos.mp4

  • Room was pretty packed with quite a few Jolla / SailfishOS friendly people at the front – managed to score myself a Jolla beanie hat from them πŸ™‚
  • I was interested in this talk because it was focussed mostly on porting Mer & SailfishOS to Android devices.
  • We have a similar porting guide in Ubuntu but ours was outdated and inaccurate. This was fixed recently.
  • The Mer project had a nice overview of ports status online (https://wiki.merproject.org/wiki/Adaptations/libhybris), which I’ve shamelessly stolen for Ubuntu (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1uUHF463g4f4L5ljWZf0l7b4VAevM-twHag4ZoEd_TNc/edit?usp=sharing)
  • Interested in the community they’re building specifically around porting – dedicated irc channel, irc meetings and real world meet-ups are something we should probably consider for our (Ubuntu) porters because right now I think our porters feel a bit helpless at times

Are distributions really boring and a solved problem? – Lucas Nussbaum
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-distributions/distributions_boring_solved_problem.mp4

  • Illuminating talk about some of the problems the Debian project faces currently
  • As I’m not a Debian developer it was interesting to me to learn a bit about the Debian Sausage Factory and some of the issues they/we face

GCompris goes Qt Quick with the help of KDE – Bruno Coudoin
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-desktops/gcompris_goes_qt_quick_with_the_help_of_kde__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • A quick talk from Bruno about the work he’s done to port GCompris to the Qt framework
  • Learned that the development model for GCompris includes using In-App-Purchases on non-free platforms (Google Play store) to fund development of Open Source projects.

Copyleft in Europe: How does copyleft interact with Exhaustion Of Rights – Amanda Brock, Andrew Katz
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-legal_and_policy_issues/copyleft_in_europe__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • This was a super fascinating and slightly complex legalese talk which I admit I didn’t completely follow, but Amanda and Andrew made it digestable for a layman such as myself πŸ™‚

Fork and Ignore: Fighting a GPL Violation By Coding Instead – Bradley M. Kuhn
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-legal_and_policy_issues/fork_and_ignore__CAM_ONLY.mp4
Slides: http://ebb.org/bkuhn/talks/LinuxCon-North-America-2014/kallithea.html

  • Brilliant talk from Bradley, one of the highlights from FOSDEM. Slides above are from a different event, but same talk as far as I can tell.
  • Was enlightening to see an alternative way to deal with a GPL violation than the default which seems to be to take legal action and sue
  • Not all forks are bad πŸ™‚

Ubuntu on phones and beyond – MichaΕ‚ Sawicz
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-desktops/ubuntu_on_phones_and_beyond__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • MichaΕ‚ gave a brief talk to a pretty packed room about the current state of Ubuntu for devices, and the future direction
  • Turned into more of a Q&A, which was beneficial as much of the audience had questions to ask
  • Was interesting to see some of the same questions come up again and again
  • Depressing to still get “Haha! LOL Amazon shills” comments and questions

Mobile == Web – Stormy Peters
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-desktops/mobile_web__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • Call to arms to developers to make their sites work well on the web for the next generation of smart phone users
  • Disappointed to see yet another Mozilla person preach about openness from the confines of a MacBook running OSX

Maintaining & Growing a technical community – Ali Spivak
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-mozilla/ud2218a_maintaining_growing_technical_community__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • Ali gave some illuminating stats about contributions to the Mozilla project and how that fluctuates over time
  • Lots of info about what motivates people to contribute to open source projects and Mozilla in particular
  • “Being open is no good if nobody can find your resources” – we (Ubuntu) have some fixes to do there

Internet all the things – using curl in your device – Daniel Stenberg
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-embedded/curl_device.mp4

  • This was one of my favourite talks from FOSDEM. Learning how many projects use a simple (hah) tool like curl
  • Even learned about some command line options in curl that I’d not seen or used before.
  • Worth a watch

Living on Mars: A Beginner’s Guide – Ryan MacDonald
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/keynotes/closing_fosdem__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • Fantastic talk to round off FOSDEM 2015. Ryan gave a fast-paced & entertaining talk about the Mars One mission plan and his part in it.

Porting Tizen:Common to open source hardware devices – Phil Coval
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-embedded/open_hw_tizen.mp4

  • Another porting talk (to go along with the Jolla one above) specifically talking about porting Tizen to Open Hardware
  • Interesting to hear about the Sunxi community build up around porting

Reached milestones and ongoing development on Replicant – Paul Kocialkowski
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-embedded/replicant_embedded_freedom.mp4

  • Fascinating talk detailing what lengths Paul goes to in order to develop a fully Free Software implementation of Android
  • In short, it’s not ‘finished’, and with the limited number of devices it’s possible to ‘open up’ probably won’t be any time soon

GNOME – creating ripples in the Linux eco-system – Sri Ramkrishna
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-desktops/gnome_creating_ripples_in_the_linux_ecosystem__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • I was somewhat disappointed in this talk as it seemed to be billed as showcasing the best of what GNOME have done over the years, but came across as poorly thought through and the points a bit laboured.

Servo (the parallel web browser) and YOU! – Josh Matthews
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-mozilla/ud2218a_servo_and_you.mp4

  • Josh did a great job of showing the state of Servo right now and where gaps exist in the functionality, certainly worth watching for the Servo demo alone

Awesome Community is Awesome

While flash sales, conferences and trade shows happen, the Community Core Apps project rolls forward landing updates and fixes to Ubuntu Phone applications. Some are default apps on the devices bq customers will soon receive, others are easily installable from the click store. All are maintained by a community of Free Software developers. I’m incredibly proud of the work these people are doing and wanted to highlight some recent updates.

As with all the applications below, if you’d like to get involved in design, documentation, testing, translation or just plain writing code either get in contact with me, or with any of the developers listed below. They’re all very nice people.

Weather Reboot

Andrew Hayzen, Victor Thompson and Nekhelesh Ramananthan got together to help Martin Borho reboot the Weather App with new designs created in collaboration with the Canonical Design Team. With a cleaner look, easier to use user interface, and fewer poke-your-eyes-out colour gradients, the new Weather app is coming along nicely!

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Doc Viewer

Stefano Verzegnassi has been working hard on the usability and performance in the Doc Viewer. It now directly pulls documents from ~/Documents on the device and can receive files via Content-Hub such as those downloaded in the browser. Rendering performance has been improved, using multi-core page rendering to make use of the grunt in powerful phones. It’s also now possible to manage documents directly in the app, so you can delete files from ~/Documents with a long-press and some taps, no file manager required. There’s also a Table of Contents revealed from a bottom edge swipe, and a new document grid view.

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While not currently a default app in devices, it’s in the store and works really well on all Ubuntu devices. Upcoming is a refinement of the full screen reading experience to remove the header and some improvements to document zooming. Longer term we’re also investigating and prototyping support for common office file formats.

Terminal

Filippo Scognamiglio recently updated the Terminal app to support configurable keyboard overlays. The overlay is a strip above the default OSK (on screen keyboard) which can be populated with keyboard shortcuts or full commands. These are designed to supplement the OSK and allow fast access to complex keyboard combinations or frequently typed commands. The Terminal app ships with a small number of sample keyboard overlays, but it’s easily user-expandable. Filippo blogged about it, read more there. If you create a cool overlay, do share it, and we may include it in a future update as a default. This update is in the store, available to install on Ubuntu devices.

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Upcoming is a user interface change to easily switch on and off the keyboard overlays. So you may have 20 installed, but rarely use some, so can easily switch them off so they don’t clutter the main UI. In addition Filippo is working on breaking up the terminal app into a re-usable component to make it easy to ship click packages containing a command line tool and terminal together. So for example a developer could bundle mutt+terminal in a click package in the store. Clearly not a typical use case for many phone users, but it’ll certainly be useful for our early adopter hacker types πŸ™‚

Calendar

Kunal Parmar has updated the Calendar app with some nice UI and performance improvements. If you sync events with the Calendar then they should show up quicker in the app than previously. He also implemented the ability to move events around the calendar with a long press and drag. More recently we’ve noticed a couple of crashers which we’re trying to get to the bottom of. Renato has a patch for EDS which seems promising! The latest Calendar update is in the store and available for testing as always.

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Calculator Reboot

Riccardo Padovani and Bartosz Kosiorek have been completing work on the Calculator ‘reboot’. We received a new design a while back which has been almost completed. We have some more design changes to make, but we plan to release this version to the store shortly as the default Calculator. You can currently test it by installing “Calculator Reboot” from the click store on your Ubuntu device. Feedback (and bugs) welcome as always.

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Reminders

Michael Zanetti and Riccardo Padovani have been really active with the Reminders app the last few weeks. Many bugs fixed, and a new offline mode for those that don’t want to connect to Evernote. There’s so many improvements which will require some additional QA before we upload to the store which should happen next week. This is a major update which has been a long time coming, and I’ll talk more about that in detail when it’s closer to landing.

Update: This update has landed in the store now!

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Dekko

Dan Chapman and Boren Zhang have been implementing designs provided by the Canonical design team in their Dekko Email app. The changes are coming thick and fast, and if you’d like to test some of the new features, then install the “Dekko (beta)” app from the click store.

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Clock

Nekhelesh Ramananthan pushed a small but important update to the Clock app recently which makes translatable the cities which are listed in the app. Once that landed we asked the Ubuntu translators if they could kindly translate the 200+ strings. Over night ~30 languages were done with more coming in over the weekend. It never ceases to amaze me how fast and attentive the Ubuntu translation communities are!

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A massive thank you to all the developers, designers, testers and translators who have helped improve all of these apps. As always, get in touch if you’d like to get involved!

Scopes Contest Mid-way Roundup

I recently blogged about my Ubuntu Scopes Contest Wishlist after we kicked off the Scopes Development Competition where Ubuntu Phone Scope developers can be in with a chance of winning cool devices and swag. See the above links for more details.

As a judge on that contest I’ve been keeping an eye out for interesting scopes that are under development for the competition. As we’re at the half way point in the contest I thought I’d mention a few. Of course me mentioning them here doesn’t mean they’re favourites or winners, I’m just raising awareness of the competition and hopefully helping to inspire more people to get involved.

Developers have until 3rd December to complete their entry to be in with a chance of winning a laptop, tablet and other cool stuff. We’ll accept new scopes in the Ubuntu Click Store at any time though πŸ™‚

Robert Schroll is working on a GMail scope giving fast access to email.

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Bogdan Cuza is developing a Mixcloud scope making it easy to search for cool songs and remixes.

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Sam Segers has a Google Places scope making it easy to find local businesses.

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Michael Weimann has been working on a Nearby Scope and has been blogging about his progress.

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Dan has also been blogging about the Cinema Scope.

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Finally Riccardo Padovani has been posting screenshots of his Duck Duck Go Scope which is already in the click store.

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I’m sure there there are other scopes I’ve missed. Feel free to link to them in the comments. It’s incredibly exciting for me to see early adopter developers embracing our fast-moving platform to realise their ideas.

Good luck to everyone entering the contest.

Ubuntu Scopes Contest Wishlist

We’re running a Scope Development Competition with prizes including a laptop, tablets, and a bunch of cool Ubuntu swag. Check the above link for details.

I’m one of the judges, so I’m not allowed to enter which is both good and bad news. Good because then you won’t see my terrible coding quality, but bad because I would really love one of these sweet Dell XPS laptops! πŸ™‚

I do have things I’d like to see made as scopes, and some ideas for making ones that I might do in the future when time permits, and I thought I’d share them. As a judge I’m not saying “make this scope and I’ll vote for your entry” of course, I simply figured I can give people some ideas, if they’re stuck. We do have a set of criteria (see link above) for rating the scopes that are submitted, and those will be used for judging. None of those criteria are “whether it was on the list on popey’s blog”. These are just ideas to get people thinking about what might be possible / useful with a scope.

Surfacing my data

One of the goals of scopes is to enable users to easily and quickly get access to their data. That could be local data on the device or remote data in a silo somewhere online. Typically on other platforms you’d need a dedicated app to get at that data. To access your Spotify playlist you need the Spotify app, to access your LinkedIn data you need the LinkedIn app and so on. Many of the sites and services where my data is held is accessible via an API of some kind. I’d love to see scopes created to surface that data directly to my face when I want it.

Manage Spotify Playlist

I use and love Spotify. One problem I have is that I don’t often add new music to my playlists. I don’t use or value the search function in the app, or the social connected features (I don’t have my Spotify hooked up to Facebook, and don’t have any friends on Facebook anyway). I tend to add new music when I’m having a real life verbal conversation with people, or when listening to the radio.

So what I would like is some quick and easy way to add tracks to my playlist, which I can subsequently play later when I’m not in the pub / driving / listening to the radio during breakfast. This could possibly sign in to Spotify using my credentials, allow me to search for tracks and then use the API to add tracks to playlist

Amazon Wishlist

My family tell me I’m really hard to buy presents for, especially at this time of year. I disagree as I have an Amazon wishlist containing over a hundred items at all price points πŸ™‚ When I visit family they may ask what’s on my wishlist to find out what I’m most interested in.

I’d like to be able to pull out my phone, and with a couple of swipes show them my wishlist. It would also be useful if it had the ability to ‘share’ the wishlist URL over some method (email is one, SMS might be another) so they get their own copy to peruse later.

I’d also like to be able to add things to the wishlist easily. Often when I’m out I think “That’s cool, would love one of those” and that could be achieved with a simple search function, then add to my wishlist.

Location Specific

Satellites Overhead

I (and my kids) like to watch the International Space Station go over. Perhaps I enjoy it more than the kids who are made to stand outside in the cold, but whatever. When I travel it would be nice to have a scope which I can turn to during twilight hours to see when the ISS (or indeed other satellites) are passing overhead. This information appears to be publicly available via well documented APIs.

Upcoming TV Programmes

I frequently forget that my favourite TV programmes are on, or available to stream. It would be awesome to pull together data from somewhere like Trakt and show me which of my most loved programmes are going to be broadcast soon, on what local TV channel.

Events Nearby

When I travel I like to know if there’s any music, social or tech events on locally that I might be interested in going to. There’s quite a few sites where people post their events including Songkick, Meetup and Eventbrite (among many others I’m sure) which have a local event look-up API. One of the cool things about scopes is you can aggregate content from multiple scopes together. So there could be a scope for each of the above mentioned sites, plus a general “Local Events” scope which pulls data from all of those together. Going to one scope and refreshing when I arrive in a new location would be a great quick way to find out what’s on locally.

Some of the above may be impractical or not possible due to API limitations or other technical issues, they’re just some ideas I had when thinking about what I would like to see on my phone. I’m sure others can come up with great ideas too! Let your imagination run wild! πŸ™‚

Good luck to all those entering the contest!

Sprinting in DC

For the last week I’ve been working with 230 other Ubuntu people in Washington, DC. We have sprints like this pretty frequently now and are a great way to collaborate and Get Things Doneβ„’ at high velocity.

This is the second sprint where we’ve invited some of the developers who are blazing a trail with our Core Apps project. Not everyone could make it to the sprint, and those who didn’t were certainly missed. These are people who give their own time to work on some of the featured and default apps on the Ubuntu Phone, and perhaps in the future on the converged desktop.

It’s been a busy week with discussion & planning punctuating intense hacking sessions. Once again I’m proud of the patience, professionalism and and hard work done by these guys working on bringing up our core apps project on a phone that hasn’t event shipped a single device yet!

We’ve spent much of the week discussing and resolving design issues, fixing performance bugs, crashers and platform integration issues, as well as the odd game of ‘Cards Against Humanity’ & ‘We Didn’t Playtest This At All’ in the bar afterwards.

Having 10 community developers in the same place as 200+ Canonical people accelerates things tremendously. Being able to go and sit with the SDK team allowed Robert Schroll to express his issues with the tools when developing Beru, the ebook reader. When Filippo Scognamiglio needed help with mouse and touch input, we could grab Florian Boucault and Daniel d’Andrada to provide tips. Having Renato Filho nearby to fix problems in Evolution Data Server allowed Kunal Parmar and Mihir Soni to resolve calendar issues. The list goes on.

All week we’ve been collaborating towards a common goal of high quality, beautiful, performant and stable applications for the phone today, and desktop of the future. It’s been an incredibly fun and productive week, and I’m a little sad to be heading home today. But I’m happy that we’ve had this time together to improve the free software we all care deeply about.

The relationships built up during these sprints will of course endure. We all exchange email addresses and IRC nicknames, so we can continue the conversation once the sprint is over. Development and meetings will continue beyond the sprint, in the virtual world of IRC, hangouts and mailing lists.